Can the quantity of pork product consumption affect how sever swine flu infects a person?

Question by Gaynor: Can the quantity of pork product consumption affect how sever swine flu infects a person?
Call me crazy, call me ignorant, but it is just curiosity. I’m sure most people have heard the comment you are what you eat. So, this saying brought me to wonder, can the quantity of pork product consumed affect the severity a person is affected by H1N1 flu virus?

Best answer:

Answer by Techwing
There is no correlation whatsoever between pork consumption and the flu, including swine flu. The swine flu gets its name from the fact that it may have “jumped” from swine to people during a mutation in the virus, but it has nothing to do with eating pork.

Add your own answer in the comments!




2 Responses to “Can the quantity of pork product consumption affect how sever swine flu infects a person?”

  1. Jillian says:

    As for whether one can get swine flu from eating a swine, the same cooking that kills North American trichinosis will also “kill” any viruses it would have. (I put kill in quotes because viruses are not technically alive. They are code that react to cells by programming to hijack the cell and force it to make copies of itself. Heat does not, therefore, “kill” the virus but disassembles it into uselessness.)

  2. kumron says:

    You don’t become “porky” by eating pork. “You are what you eat” is wildly exaggerated. The basic chemicals of food are all broken down and re-formed into human versions before being incorporated into your body.

    You don’t get swine flu from eating pork. Even raw pork from an infected animal is unlikely to give you swine flu, and I assume you’re not planning to eat your pork raw. To get the flu you have to breathe it into your lungs or bloodstream, which usually means touching your mouth or eyes after touching fluids from an infected animal, which is far more likely to be a human than a cooked piece of pork.

    This virus doesn’t even appear to have evolved in pigs. It’s called “swine flu” because it bears certain characteristics of a previous flu believed to have evolved in pigs. There aren’t any documented cases of transfer of this particular strain of flu from pigs to humans. It have evolved in birds or even cows.

    So no matter how much pork you ate, you’re not particularly susceptible to this virus.


Powered by Yahoo! Answers